Situated within a Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea conservation area, this unique home was most recently remodelled in the 1990s by the Manser Practice and is comprised of two perpendicular townhouses connected by an L-shaped glazed link. Initially tasked with remodelling the house’s living, dining and kitchen areas, Studio Bua oversaw a seamless extension and refurbishment of the wider property, including rear extensions to both townhouses, as well as a replacement of the glazed link between them. The design, which responds to the client’s request for a soft, modern interior that maximises available space, was led by Studio Bua’s ex-Manser Practice principal Mark Smyth. It combines a series of small-scale interventions, such as a new honed slate fireplace, with more significant structural changes, including the removal of a chimney and threading through of a new steel frame. Studio Bua, who were eager to bring new life to the space while retaining its original spirit, selected natural materials such as oak and marble to bring warmth and texture to the otherwise minimal interior. Also, rather than use a conventional aluminium system for the glazed link, the studio chose to work with specialist craftsmen to create a link in lacquered timber and glass. The scheme also includes the addition of a stylish first-floor terrace, which is linked to the refurbished living area by a large sash window and features a walk-on rooflight that brings natural light to the redesigned master suite below. In the master bedroom, a new limestone-clad bathtub and bespoke vanity unit are screened from the main bedroom by a floor-to-ceiling partition, which doubles as hanging space for an artwork. Studio Bua’s design also responds to the client’s desire to find new opportunities to display their art collection. To create the ideal setting for artist Craig-Martin’s neon pink steel sculpture, the studio transformed the boiler room roof into a raised plinth, replaced the existing rooflight with modern curtain walling and worked closely with the artist to ensure the lighting arrangement perfectly frames the artwork. Contractor: John F Patrick Structural engineer: Aspire Consulting Photographer: Andy Matthews

Low-flow toilets, which use 1.6 gallons of water per flush, are required by law in all new and remodeled baths. Pressure-assisted toilets effectively clear the bowl with one flush, but make considerable noise in the process. Gravity models sometimes require two flushes to clean the bowl properly. For maximum efficiency, choose a bowl with a large water surface. Make sure there's sufficient space around the toilet for comfortable access—ideally, at least 16 inches from the centerline of the toilet and walls or fixtures on either side. Also allow at least 30 inches from the front of the toilet to the nearest object.
It was the start of a year-and-a-half basement finishing project, but it was well worth all of the effort. Jamin and Ashley of the home design blog The Handmade Home began by installing drywall over the cinderblock walls, applying spray foam insulation, and enclosing the necessary but ugly supporting adjustable steel posts. Next came paint, flooring, and furniture, all fusing together to make a lovely daylight basement for work and play.

A popular option for those whose dining rooms flow naturally from the kitchen is to blow out the dining room to expand their kitchen’s footprint. Given the fact that the kitchen is increasingly becoming the hub of activity, it makes sense to remodel this space to accommodate today’s changing lifestyles. Whether it’s adding an island or room for extra seating to creating an eat-in kitchen perfect for family gathering or building a gourmet kitchen complete with dual ovens, more counter space, and the cabinets you’ve always dreamed of, sacrificing your dining room to get a more functional kitchen is one sacrifice you’ll be glad you made.
Living room expansions require evaluation of the existing site conditions of the space, particularly the structural elements in the room such as the columns, beams and interior partitions. Be prepared to find other problems as you go like the possibility of termites, mold problems or asbestos. In some cases, there are also load bearing walls that will need additional work for support. Existing outlets, ventilation systems, plumbing and electricity may also need to be moved or relocated.
General stores are a reminder of warm cozy days gone by. As a theory for room décor, those memories return full on by design. One-dimensional wall hangings, an antique-looking corner buffet with drawers, straight back accent chair, and mesh wire centerpiece with shadow box holder and a tin tub accent evokes memories of pies baking, noses twitching, and mouths watering.
Previously buried under decades of neglect, Tere and Mac Thomas's circa-1825 Mississippi home has new stories to tell, thanks to diligent research—and a three-year gut renovation. When the Thomases purchased their Fayette, Mississippi, home six years ago, it was uninhabitable. However, the unfinished rooms, like this dilapidated living room, allowed the homeowners to start from scratch to create the perfect home.
Are you interested in transforming your dining space from a bland, lifeless layout to a charming farmhouse design that’s warm and welcoming? Is your new design almost complete, but you’re looking for a few extra touches to complete the look? Whatever you’re looking for, these farmhouse dining room design ideas add a vintage-inspired touch that can make you feel like you stepped into an old country farmhouse, even if you live in a suburban area. These inviting, wide-open spaces offer a sense of peace and calmness that you can’t get with most modern designs.
A popular option for those whose dining rooms flow naturally from the kitchen is to blow out the dining room to expand their kitchen’s footprint. Given the fact that the kitchen is increasingly becoming the hub of activity, it makes sense to remodel this space to accommodate today’s changing lifestyles. Whether it’s adding an island or room for extra seating to creating an eat-in kitchen perfect for family gathering or building a gourmet kitchen complete with dual ovens, more counter space, and the cabinets you’ve always dreamed of, sacrificing your dining room to get a more functional kitchen is one sacrifice you’ll be glad you made.
Ambience is everything. The use of a stained ladder holding up three ballroom chandeliers grace this in-home eatery. The butcher block “prep”-style dining table is surrounded by rustic whitewashed metal bistro chairs and covered in a miller’s sackcloth table runner. Spruced with painted gourds and a built-in buffet, this straight-line dining area gives edgy touches to the word classic.
Maybe it’s just great extra space, a blank palette—there are so many awesome ways you can use the basement. A movie room, game room, family room or kitchenette can provide a special place for the family to bond and have fun. Man caves and/or woman caves have become trendy and there are plenty of modern basement cave ideas available to inspire your own private space.
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