Looking for living room ideas? Whether your living room is lacklustre, your lounge is limited in space, your sitting room is suffering from outdated decor or your front room is full of clutter, there are living room ideas and designs that will inspire you to breathe life into your living space. Discover small living room ideas to help maximise tiny spaces or layout ideas that will work with awkward shaped living rooms. Perhaps you’re struggling to decide on living room colours? Read on for help with colours, layout and design ideas, or find inspiration from the millions of living room photos on Houzz.
A minor renovation for a living room remodel project typically includes simple work such as repainting walls and ceiling, installation of wallpaper, changing lighting fixtures, resourcing new furniture pieces, installing a knock down shelf, adding accessories or changing soft furnishings like window treatments, upholstery or textiles – basically anything that does not require an extensive amount of demolition or structural change in the space. Minor renovations may be taken on as a “Do It Yourself” project, especially if you have prior knowledge and experience on such. On the average, minor renovations cost less in terms of labor because it eliminates the need to hire subcontractors or even construction professionals.
If a total kitchen transformation is what you’re after, it’s time to redo your flooring. Many choices are available nowadays. And if you’re looking for a durable, easy-to-clean option and love the traditional appeal of hardwood, consider a wood-look alternative such as vinyl or this glazed ceramic tile, which you can also use on the wall as a rustic backsplash.
Adding built in shelves and custom cabinets and media centers will require the services of a finish carpenter or a cabinet maker. On the average, the cost of installing built in furniture for living room renovation projects run from $290 to $1300 per unit, with prices varying based on the type of material and finishing, its size, style and the complexity of the design.
There's a lot to love about this kitchen designed by Arent & Pyke, but we're particularly impressed by the careful, asymmetrical balance happening here. The hood leans to the right of the room, as do the bar stools, which is subtlety reflected in the cream lumbar pillow camouflaging into the sofa. Meanwhile, the linear floating shelf in line with the hood as well as the light fixture, island counter, and sofa form a soothing sense of symmetry.
Before starting your living room remodel, the first thing that you need to assess are the aspects that you don’t like in the space. This may either be limited space, a problematic layout, a drab color scheme, outdated furniture and decor. Your living room may also have a dark ambiance, a gloomy atmosphere or may feel too closed in. It may lack in character or maybe, you just want to give it an update to make it more modern.  Once you get an idea of the things that you want to change in your existing living room, you may now determine the level of remodeling that you need for your home.
Living room expansions require evaluation of the existing site conditions of the space, particularly the structural elements in the room such as the columns, beams and interior partitions. Be prepared to find other problems as you go like the possibility of termites, mold problems or asbestos. In some cases, there are also load bearing walls that will need additional work for support. Existing outlets, ventilation systems, plumbing and electricity may also need to be moved or relocated.
The approximate costs and value of a typical Dining Room Remodeling project are summarized below. Use higher estimates for larger metropolitan areas and the lower estimates where home prices are below the national average. Adjust costs for substitutions or refinements in the last section. For size differences of up to 25%, scale total costs in direct proportion to the size of your project. Use the adjusted costs as a basis for setting a material budget and for comparing contractor bids (if you choose to have a professional perform the work).
There's a lot to love about this kitchen designed by Arent & Pyke, but we're particularly impressed by the careful, asymmetrical balance happening here. The hood leans to the right of the room, as do the bar stools, which is subtlety reflected in the cream lumbar pillow camouflaging into the sofa. Meanwhile, the linear floating shelf in line with the hood as well as the light fixture, island counter, and sofa form a soothing sense of symmetry.
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