Are you interested in transforming your dining space from a bland, lifeless layout to a charming farmhouse design that’s warm and welcoming? Is your new design almost complete, but you’re looking for a few extra touches to complete the look? Whatever you’re looking for, these farmhouse dining room design ideas add a vintage-inspired touch that can make you feel like you stepped into an old country farmhouse, even if you live in a suburban area. These inviting, wide-open spaces offer a sense of peace and calmness that you can’t get with most modern designs.
Situated within a Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea conservation area, this unique home was most recently remodelled in the 1990s by the Manser Practice and is comprised of two perpendicular townhouses connected by an L-shaped glazed link. Initially tasked with remodelling the house’s living, dining and kitchen areas, Studio Bua oversaw a seamless extension and refurbishment of the wider property, including rear extensions to both townhouses, as well as a replacement of the glazed link between them. The design, which responds to the client’s request for a soft, modern interior that maximises available space, was led by Studio Bua’s ex-Manser Practice principal Mark Smyth. It combines a series of small-scale interventions, such as a new honed slate fireplace, with more significant structural changes, including the removal of a chimney and threading through of a new steel frame. Studio Bua, who were eager to bring new life to the space while retaining its original spirit, selected natural materials such as oak and marble to bring warmth and texture to the otherwise minimal interior. Also, rather than use a conventional aluminium system for the glazed link, the studio chose to work with specialist craftsmen to create a link in lacquered timber and glass. The scheme also includes the addition of a stylish first-floor terrace, which is linked to the refurbished living area by a large sash window and features a walk-on rooflight that brings natural light to the redesigned master suite below. In the master bedroom, a new limestone-clad bathtub and bespoke vanity unit are screened from the main bedroom by a floor-to-ceiling partition, which doubles as hanging space for an artwork. Studio Bua’s design also responds to the client’s desire to find new opportunities to display their art collection. To create the ideal setting for artist Craig-Martin’s neon pink steel sculpture, the studio transformed the boiler room roof into a raised plinth, replaced the existing rooflight with modern curtain walling and worked closely with the artist to ensure the lighting arrangement perfectly frames the artwork. Contractor: John F Patrick Structural engineer: Aspire Consulting Photographer: Andy Matthews
Increasing numbers of homeowners decide to enhance the existing concrete in their basement instead of covering it up. Stained and painted concrete floors offer many benefits, including their suitability for people with allergies. Skilled contractors can reproduce the look of slate, tile and marble, or they can apply dyes, paints and stencils in a variety of designs.
Windows – If your living room lacks ventilation or looks too dark, you can also try to replace existing windows or add windows to your living room. Replacing old windows helps improve natural lighting, optimizes energy efficiency and gives added ventilation. In addition to the practical benefits, new windows can also contribute a new character to your living room.
Cotton or linen fibers, brilliant sparkling glass, pewter highlights, and articulated wooden spindles give a well-appointed room a hint of authentic vintage-inspired flair. The proper balance, when mixed with cross back chairs and chairs covered in stitched tapestry designs, “clash” together in a harmonious mix that will make any throwback design an updated treasure.
Boxy shapes and tin-pan metals make up the theme of this eating area masterpiece. It doubles as a game room and triples as a simple gathering place to plan family events. The repurposed stove vent overhead lighting and canned greenery, with mismatched bench seating and cross back chairs surrounding a long bench table make this country-style room a unique display.

Homeowners in search of a warm, professional look for their basements often turn to drywall. Drywall ceilings help the basement look as good as upstairs living areas. Drywall can be treated with a variety of textures that are applied by roller or spray applicator. One difficulty associated with drywall ceilings is the necessity of framing in duct work.
Oinks, clucks, and moos give this delicately stressed white-washed plaque a hefty desire to find itself in the center of a country-themed kitchen. Placed against a wooden fresco caged bird painting and standing next to a spiny bird’s nest floral design holding two beautiful pale blue robin eggs, the plaque is an absolute statement in the cycle of nature.
In older homes the formal dining room is often a separate, walled-in space. And while this helps create a more intimate space, it can also make a home feel compartmentalized and claustrophobic. Today it’s all about the open floor plan. One of the best ways to open up your home and increase your living space is to knock down the walls that separate your living and dining rooms. Note: don’t go knocking down walls yourself. Leave any structural changes to the pros.
If ditching your dining room means nixing the wall between the dining room and kitchen, creating that open floor plan will cost you, on average, between $1,400 and $4,600. When demolishing a wall inside your home, professionals will need to move appliances and possibly even plumbing. Once the wall has come down, you still need to factor in the costs associated with redesigning the flow of your new kitchen-dining room space.
A wooden scroll with inscribed sentiment hanging on a thick burlap string is a focal point in this designer’s dream room. Two candlestick lamps in contrasting colors on an unfinished bread table completes the sleek sophisticated look, along with a rustic grocery store scale cloaked in greenery, a metal crate holding gourds and sprigs of fresh herbs.
How fast the job needs to be completed has a significant impact on the final price. A professional team can take a basement from framing to complete in about 45 days. A DIYer typically needs more time. If things need to be inspected, inspectors work on their own schedule, and if concrete needs to be poured, time must be allotted for it to properly set.
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