Sometimes a finished basement floor makes the bottom stair a little too shallow, throwing off the whole run. Tom Silva's fix: Measure the rise of each step. If any are shorter than 7 inches, you can remove the treads and add spacers to pad them out as you go up. Just keep heights below code maximum, and make sure they don't differ in height by more than ⅜ inch.


One of the keys to a successful renovation is plenty of forethought, knowledge and information — especially if you're making structural changes, or working with several professionals and a big budget. Take your time to plan before you begin, so that you are less likely to have regrets when you are finished. "Designing a room or a remodeling project is a journey or a process," says interior designer Karen Soojian, ASID, "and it takes time to develop ideas and do things right. In other words, you need to know your destination and how you plan to get there."
A popular option for those whose dining rooms flow naturally from the kitchen is to blow out the dining room to expand their kitchen’s footprint. Given the fact that the kitchen is increasingly becoming the hub of activity, it makes sense to remodel this space to accommodate today’s changing lifestyles. Whether it’s adding an island or room for extra seating to creating an eat-in kitchen perfect for family gathering or building a gourmet kitchen complete with dual ovens, more counter space, and the cabinets you’ve always dreamed of, sacrificing your dining room to get a more functional kitchen is one sacrifice you’ll be glad you made.
Remodeling a finished basement is costlier. The demo can cost from $1,500 to around $3,000 to prep the site. System upgrades include expanding the HVAC and electrical, but even if you already have a bathroom in place, remodeling can add $1,000 to $4,000. Finally, the finishing work can be kept low if you stay with the basics, but upgrades to hardwood floors and other luxuries will add $7,000 to $10,000 to the job. On average, expect to pay $13,200 to $30,500 for this job.

The kitchen is probably the most used room in your house, so you want it to be a space you enjoy spending time in. And aside from functioning appliances, a kitchen design you'll love for years to come is of utmost importance. So whether you're renovating or simply looking for some inspiration, we found 85 kitchen ideas that will help you optimize your own—and the best lessons to take from them. From country casual to sleek and modern—and literally everything in between–we've got all the kitchen remodel inspiration you could ever need. Gorgeous countertops, unique backsplashes, and statement lighting, we're coming for you.


A kitchen island can cost you anywhere from $200 to $6,000. Portablemodels that provide basic counter space and a little storage underneath are a couple hundred dollars, whereas having a stationary island installed will cost closer to $1,000. If you add plumbing and electricity, expect it to cost you between $3,000 and $6,000, maybe more. Adding new kitchen cabinets provides you with another diverse price range. Pre-made cabinets from the store will cost anywhere from $50 to over $200 a unit. If you want custom cabinets, depending on the materials, the size of the kitchen, and the extras (like spice racks) you may end up paying between $12,000 and $40,000
With the possibility of unforeseeable issues, it is best to have a contingency fund to make you prepared along the process. In addition, room expansions for living room renovation projects should not be taken lightly and must be left to the hands of a trusted professional. Scout for a good contractor as he will be able to assess everything carefully, spot problem areas ahead of time and prepare a complete bid.

These homeowners wanted to let their guests be the color to their space, so they painted all of the background surfaces, including the brick fireplace, a clean shade of white. A vintage advertisement and an Arkansas license plate hang on the wall. The casual furniture is covered in washable slipcovers for easy cleanup when inevitable spills happen.
There are literally hundreds of ways to do lighting fixtures. Most people who are looking for that “unique” factor head for junkyards or cruise throw-aways looking for ideas. Recycling sturdy toss-outs, like a small crate box or old horse stable lantern, and outfitting it with bronze or metallic light fixtures can perk up a dark area with some style.
Planning is the first stage with any basement bathroom installation. For a basement that's designed as a recreation room, work space, or kids' play area, a half-bath (stool and sink, but no shower or tub) is adequate. A basement with bedroom or en suite needs a full bathroom. Knowing how you plan to use the basement living space typically dictates the functional purpose of its bathroom.
It was the start of a year-and-a-half basement finishing project, but it was well worth all of the effort. Jamin and Ashley of the home design blog The Handmade Home began by installing drywall over the cinderblock walls, applying spray foam insulation, and enclosing the necessary but ugly supporting adjustable steel posts. Next came paint, flooring, and furniture, all fusing together to make a lovely daylight basement for work and play.
The cheapest flooring options for living room remodel projects are vinyl, laminate and cork floors, however they do not have the same quality as the materials mentioned above. Cork and vinyl flooring can get easily scratched by furniture and they do not have much aesthetic appeal. Ultimately, what you decide to use as a flooring material for your living room renovation project will depend on the look you want to achieve and the purpose of the room
Living Room Size and Layout – The size of a room is one of the key cost factors in determining the total amount of budget that you will be needing for a living room remodel project. The size of the room does not only determine the total area of the space, but it also partially defines the scope of work for the project. This is mainly because most of the aspects of construction are affected by the square footage of the site and oftentimes materials and labor are priced per square foot.
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