Planning is the first stage with any basement bathroom installation. For a basement that's designed as a recreation room, work space, or kids' play area, a half-bath (stool and sink, but no shower or tub) is adequate. A basement with bedroom or en suite needs a full bathroom. Knowing how you plan to use the basement living space typically dictates the functional purpose of its bathroom.
The average costs for living room remodels run a minimum of $518 for a 300 to 400 square foot space, while for areas which have an area of 400 to 500 square foot. have an average cost of  $782. The prices increase accordingly as the size of the space vary, so naturally larger living rooms that are 500 to 600 square feet in size cost  $982, while spaces that have an area of 600 to 800 square foot have average remodeling costs that run anywhere for, $1200 to $2000.
Estimate the overall cost to install drywall in the basement at approximately $1.50 per square foot. The basic drywall panel measures 8-feet tall and 4-feet wide and is available in thicknesses that range from 1/4" to 5/8". This standard panel usually costs between $10 and $20. Price will vary depending on the brand, panel's thickness, and if it has any special features like mold resistance which may be beneficial for a basement space. Other material costs when adding drywall include the hardware to secure it to the framing, joint tape, and drywall mud.
4. Interview basement remodeling contractors. You may be tempted to try and save money by managing a basement remodel yourself, but it's most likely worth it to hire a professional. Check affiliations, licensing and referrals and/or reviews from neighbors and friends before interviewing contractors for the final selection to be sure to avoid choosing a bad remodeler. Contractors who specialize in basement remodeling may be better equipped to handle your project.
Situated within a Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea conservation area, this unique home was most recently remodelled in the 1990s by the Manser Practice and is comprised of two perpendicular townhouses connected by an L-shaped glazed link. Initially tasked with remodelling the house’s living, dining and kitchen areas, Studio Bua oversaw a seamless extension and refurbishment of the wider property, including rear extensions to both townhouses, as well as a replacement of the glazed link between them. The design, which responds to the client’s request for a soft, modern interior that maximises available space, was led by Studio Bua’s ex-Manser Practice principal Mark Smyth. It combines a series of small-scale interventions, such as a new honed slate fireplace, with more significant structural changes, including the removal of a chimney and threading through of a new steel frame. Studio Bua, who were eager to bring new life to the space while retaining its original spirit, selected natural materials such as oak and marble to bring warmth and texture to the otherwise minimal interior. Also, rather than use a conventional aluminium system for the glazed link, the studio chose to work with specialist craftsmen to create a link in lacquered timber and glass. The scheme also includes the addition of a stylish first-floor terrace, which is linked to the refurbished living area by a large sash window and features a walk-on rooflight that brings natural light to the redesigned master suite below. In the master bedroom, a new limestone-clad bathtub and bespoke vanity unit are screened from the main bedroom by a floor-to-ceiling partition, which doubles as hanging space for an artwork. Studio Bua’s design also responds to the client’s desire to find new opportunities to display their art collection. To create the ideal setting for artist Craig-Martin’s neon pink steel sculpture, the studio transformed the boiler room roof into a raised plinth, replaced the existing rooflight with modern curtain walling and worked closely with the artist to ensure the lighting arrangement perfectly frames the artwork. Contractor: John F Patrick Structural engineer: Aspire Consulting Photographer: Andy Matthews
If ditching your dining room means nixing the wall between the dining room and kitchen, creating that open floor plan will cost you, on average, between $1,400 and $4,600. When demolishing a wall inside your home, professionals will need to move appliances and possibly even plumbing. Once the wall has come down, you still need to factor in the costs associated with redesigning the flow of your new kitchen-dining room space.
Any project involving electrical, plumbing, or turning the basement into a livable space, requires permits. Plumbing must be done to code for proper drainage to avoid health issues. It also has to ensure flushing certain waste back into the sewer. Electrical issues can cause short-circuits, blown breakers, and fires. The chance of something happening increases if installation is not done properly from the start, including acquiring the proper permits. If creating a bedroom or other regular living space, permits are required. Emergency escape avenues (for fire and other emergencies) need to be in place as well.
Steven Gambrel, one of America's top-tier interior designers, recently had a chance to consider the question. Although he lives and often works in the most urbane precincts of Manhattan, Steven grew up in Virginia and still has ties there. When the owners of a Middleburg horse farm asked him to convert one of their barns into a place for large, casual parties and just hanging out and watching TV, he took it on with relish—his first barn, and on home turf.
Living Room Size and Layout – The size of a room is one of the key cost factors in determining the total amount of budget that you will be needing for a living room remodel project. The size of the room does not only determine the total area of the space, but it also partially defines the scope of work for the project. This is mainly because most of the aspects of construction are affected by the square footage of the site and oftentimes materials and labor are priced per square foot.
Keep a list – Creating a list of the things that you need for your living room remodel project  allows you to keep track of the expenses that you might incur as you go along with the renovation. Prioritize important items first, then put a contingency for extra items like accessories and other decorations. Leave room for finishing touches as they can go a long way in terms of visual appeal.
You can begin planning for your kitchen remodel by knowing a rough estimate of where your money will be spent. For a full kitchen renovation, 1/3 of your budget will go to cabinetry, 1/3 will be spent on installation, and the remaining 1/3 is allocated to finishing touches. Finishing touches could be appliances, lighting, faucets, sinks, plumbing, backsplash, countertops, or flooring. Keeping these in mind, you’ll be able to balance your budget and more easily plan your project. For additional details on the cost of remodeling a kitchen, please visit our cost guide.
On the other hand, major renovations for a living room remodel project are more labor intensive, take longer time to finish and typically require professional help. Major renovations may involve structural modifications, demolition work, electrical wiring and typically include improvements done on the floor, walls and ceiling. It may also include a series of minor renovations, thus making it more of a larger scale project in the process. Major renovations are also sometimes referred to as a “full renovation” because instead of just improving a part of the living room, the scope of work requires enhancement and constructions works for the whole space and all its elements – meaning wall, floor, ceiling, furniture, furnishings and lighting. Examples of major renovation works are demolition works like removing an existing partition, tearing down the whole ceiling. Electrical works like rewiring, taking out all old flooring and installing new materials, retiling of floors, construction of a drop, recessed or cove ceiling and the like.
Maybe it’s just great extra space, a blank palette—there are so many awesome ways you can use the basement. A movie room, game room, family room or kitchenette can provide a special place for the family to bond and have fun. Man caves and/or woman caves have become trendy and there are plenty of modern basement cave ideas available to inspire your own private space.
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